lunes, 22 de abril de 2013

¡¡VAMOS A ESTUDIAR UNOS CUANTOS IDIOMS, VENGA!! :)


SPLITTING HAIRS: making insignificant distinctions. Calgary Herald (Canada): <<The CBC revealed on the weekend that RBC was bringing in temporary foreign workers from India to take over the jobs of Canadians. ... The bank is now facing calls on social media sites for customers to boycott RBC for this practice.
RBC is trying to quell the anger, but so far, its explanation sounds like little more than splitting hairs.
“RBC is not hiring new employees that are temporary foreign workers to do that work,” said Zabeen Hirji, chief human resources officer for the bank. Rather, an Indian company called iGATE hired the workers who will replace the 45 RBC IT specialists. Those foreign workers being trained in Canada right now “are going to be the supplier’s employees.”>>


CAUGHT RED-HANDED: apprehended (caught) in the act of committing a crime. Bermuda Sun: <<A mother of two today admitted stealing two tubes of lip gloss from the Phoenix Pharmacy after she was caught red-handed.

Donita Maxine Smith, 23, pleaded guilty in Magistrates’ Court to stealing two tubes of Maybelline Super Stay ten-hour Stain Gloss from the Phoenix on March 26. The items were valued at $20.
The court heard Smith was in the store at 11:25am that day when she was seen by a security officer [shoving] two tubes of lip gloss into her jacket sleeve.>>


UNDER THE RADAR: without being noticed. Foxnews.com: <<The new strain of bird flu that has killed 17 people in China has been circulating widely "under the radar" and has acquired significant genetic diversity that makes it more of a threat, scientists said on Friday. >>

OLD WIVES' TALE: superstition. WTOP news radio, Washington: <<It sounds like an old wives' tale: To get rid of bedbugs, all you need are leaves.

Bean leaves, to be exact.
For generations, housewives in the Balkans in Eastern Europe would spread the leaves around a room because bedbugs "get impaled by these little hooks on the tips and get trapped," says University of California-Irvine professor Robert Corn. >>


LAY LOW or LIE LOW (intransitive verb): hide, not go out in public frequently, keep a low profile. Usually in the U.S. it's "lay low," although that's technically incorrect. Hamilton Spectator (Canada): <<Winners lay low, but we know four will split $63.4m jackpot

Lotto officials were waiting to hear from the four ticket holders who won a share of what is touted as the largest lotto jackpot in Canadian history.>>
To be LAID LOW is different: it means to be knocked down. I had the worst case of the flu this year! I was laid low for four whole days.

OLD WIVES' TALE: superstition. WTOP news radio, Washington: <<It sounds like an old wives' tale: To get rid of bedbugs, all you need are leaves.
Bean leaves, to be exact.

For generations, housewives in the Balkans in Eastern Europe would spread the leaves around a room because bedbugs "get impaled by these little hooks on the tips and get trapped," says University of California-Irvine professor Robert Corn. >>

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